Tenable Network Security Podcast Episode 172 - "Web Interface Command Execution, HTTP Error Codes"

Welcome to the Tenable Network Security Podcast Episode 172

Announcements

Discussion & Highlighted Plugins

Web Interface Command Execution

  • This is a particularly critical type of vulnerability. Make certain you understand the context, e.g., if the exploit requires authentication or not. The ability to execute operating system commands via the web interface allows an attacker to easily take control of a system. I've encountered command execution vulnerabilities in several different forms, and most of the time, with a little testing, it's possible to fully compromise the system. Many systems do not offer command line access. However, the web interface allows you to run commands, often without restrictions since the system assumes the user will never see "under the covers." The plugin released this month covers a web command exception for z/OS, IBM's mainframe platform, making this an interesting situation. How can we more easily detect this type of vulnerability in our environments?

Detecting HTTP Error Codes

  • Several new PVS plugins detect HTTP error codes. This could be indicative of a host on your internal network looking for vulnerabilities in external sites.

Categorizing Vulnerabilities by Software Type

  • Several new reports and dashboards were created to allow you to analyze vulnerabilities by software type. How does this help you analyze risk and improve your vulnerability management program?

New & Notable Plugins

Nessus

Passive Vulnerability Scanner

SecurityCenter Dashboards & Report Templates

Configuration & Compliance Auditing

Nessus ProfessionalFeed and SecurityCenter customers can download compliance checks from the Tenable Support Portal.

Security News Stories

  1. Counter-Strike? | CSO Blogs
  2. De-ICE 1.40 LiveCD Hacking Challenge Released
  3. 2012 Browser Security Comparative Analysis: Socially Engineered Malware | NSS Labs
  4. Google researcher discloses zero-day exploit for Windows
  5. LinkedIn aims to keep hackers out with two-factor login
  6. How to Hack an iPhone With a USB Charger
  7. Moving Safely From Detection To Automated Action